Thursday, April 12, 2018

Arthro-Pod Episode 41 Find Your Why with Kristie Reddick


Howdy, howdy bug lovers! On today's episode we step back from entomology a bit and talk with Kristie Reddick of The Bug Chick about framing "your why". If you are a student or are struggling at work to keep slogging through a difficult time, thinking about why you are doing what you are doing can sometimes help get you back in the flow. As Kristie says in the episode "what makes us go, can help us grow." 



After you sit down and think about your "why" for why you are on social media, why you do research, why you like insects, share it with us on Twitter with #mysciencewhy


Our guest Kristie Reddick and her arthropod friend

Be sure to find Kristie and Jess online at https://thebugchicks.com/
You can also find them on Twitter a @thebugchicks and on Facebook

Kristie and Jess are out there doing great work, check out their site and hire them!



Questions? Comments? 
Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_Podshow

Follow the hosts on Twitter @JLarson_UNL@JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36

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Subscribe to our feed on Feedburner!  



We're on Stitcher too! 


This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/




Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

Friday, March 30, 2018

Arthro-Pod on the Road: At the ESA NCB Share Fair



Jody and Jonathan take Arthro-Pod on the road and head up to Wisconsin! There, they take part in the Entomological Society of America's North Central Branch meeting and interview entomologists as they go through the Extension Share Fair. 







At our podcast booth we had our equipment and a large die for volunteers to roll. After getting a number they answered the corresponding questions. Tune in to find out what



Thanks to everyone who stopped by the booth and to swap stories!


Questions? Comments? 
Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_Podshow

Follow the hosts on Twitter @JLarson_UNL@JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36

Get the show through iTunes!

Subscribe to our feed on Feedburner!  




We're on Stitcher too! 


This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/




Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

Tuesday, March 27, 2018

Arthro-Pod Episode 40 Women in Entomology Part 1


Howdy, howdy bug lovers! Today's show is part one of a two part series on women in entomology as we celebrate Women's History Month. For this episode your three regular hosts get together to introduce the topic and get the conversation going and the second episode we will feature guest interviews about current issues for women in entomology. 


We start our discussion today though by talking about two luminaries in entomological history, Maria Sibylla Merian and Edith Patch. After that, Jody solicited stories from scientists of today to hear about mentors and issues that persist in our field. We also discuss the role of social media in breaking down barriers, as we saw with #BugsR4girls. We hope you enjoy and learn a little something about our history and how we can still work towards a more equal tomorrow.  


Maria Merian (left) and Dr. Edith Patch are our two historical luminaries for today's episode!
Show notes:

To learn more about Maria Sibylla Merian, check out these resources





To learn more about Dr. Patch, check out these resources
Photos of Patchiella (under a CC BY 3.0 license)

Friends of Edith Patch - “non-profit organization dedicated to celebrating and continuing the legacy of Dr. Edith Marion Patch, a pioneering entomologist whose scientific, educational, and environmental work expanded the ecological understandings of scientists, educators, children, and families around the world.”


We also want to thank everyone who retweeted, favorited, or responded to Jody on Twitter! Your responses were very helpful in making our Women in Entomology Series!





Questions? Comments? 
Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_Podshow

Follow the hosts on Twitter @JLarson_UNL@JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36

Get the show through iTunes!

Subscribe to our feed on Feedburner!  



We're on Stitcher too! 


This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/




Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

Thursday, March 15, 2018

Arthro-Pod EP 39: Talkin' Termites with Hannah Davis



Hello bug lovers and welcome to our latest episode! On today's show Jody Green meets up with Hannah Davis to talk termites! The reason we are featuring those particular insects is that this week (March 12-17) is Termite Awareness Week. While this national spotlight on termites is focused on the problems they can cause, Hannah and Jody highlight the fact that not all termites are bad and some are even necessary! 


Tune in if you want to learn about the wacky life cycle of a termite, how their colonies work, and why termites are considered social cockroaches!

Hannah using an aspirator, or "pooter", to move termites from one box to another

Part of the discussion our termite scientists have today is centered around the recent media postings regarding termites being social cockroaches. Despite this research having been published for a while, there is a sense of interest in this topic right now: 


The blue termite in this image was stained with Nile blue (a histological stain), then treated with an entomopathogenic fungus. The other termites grooming it are demonstrating why biocontrol with fungi does not yet work
Hannah was kind enough to provide a link to a cool film on termite gut flagellates:

You can also find Hannah's personal website here: http://hedavis.net/
Or, connect with her over Twitter @berlinbuggirl

Questions? Comments? 

Follow the hosts on Twitter @JLarson_UNL@JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36

Get the show through iTunes!

Subscribe to our feed on Feedburner!  


We're on Stitcher too! 


This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/




Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

Arthro-Pod Episode 38: Get To Know Andy Deans


Howdy bug lovers and welcome to today's show! In this episode Mike Skvarla goes solo to interview his colleague Andy Deans of Penn State University. Dr. Deans is a natural historian and runs the Frost Museum as well. Tune in to hear all about it!




Check out the following links to learn more about Andy and the museum


Frost Museum curators blog: http://sites.psu.edu/frost/

Questions? Comments? 

Follow the hosts on Twitter @JLarson_UNL@JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36

Get the show through iTunes!

Subscribe to our feed on Feedburner!  


We're on Stitcher too! 


This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/




Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

Wednesday, February 28, 2018

Arthro-Pod Episode 37: Bugging out with Matt Bertone


Hey there bug lovers! On today's episode of Arthro-Pod we catch up with Matt Bertone of NC State and learn about his role as an insect identifier, how to best scoop cow dung into scientific samples, and what kinds of arthropods dwell in your home!
Tune in to learn all about it!
Dr. Bertone is not only a great scientist but also an expert photographer!

One of the big projects we chat with Matt about is an indoor arthropod survey, you can read all about it at this link: https://peerj.com/articles/1582/


Take a second to connect with our guest on Twitter, you can find him: 
@Bertonemyia
Questions? Comments? 

Follow the hosts on Twitter @JLarson_UNL@JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36

Get the show through iTunes!

Subscribe to our feed on Feedburner!  


We're on Stitcher too! 


This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/




Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

Tuesday, February 13, 2018

Arthro-Pod EP 36 Bee Venom and Apitherapy



Hey there bug lovers! On our latest episode we are will dissect the contents of bee venom and discuss the possible medical uses of it. Bee venom is a chemical cocktail of pain inducing compounds but many people allow themselves to be stung for therapeutic reasons. Data suggests that there may be promising results but there is also reason for extreme caution before pursuing this course of action. 

Honey bees have many uses, is one of them medicinal? (Photo credit: Jim Kalisch; UNL Entomology)
A bee sting removed from the bee (Photo credit: Jim Kalisch; UNL Entomology)

Definitions to consider:

Apitherapy: The use of honey bee related products for medicinal purposes. Includes venom, honey, beeswax, etc.

Bee venom therapy (BVT):  "in which bee venom is used for medicinal purposes, is available worldwide, but is primarily utilized in Asia, Eastern Europe, and South America. The diverse therapeutic applications of BVT include various musculoskeletal conditions, such as arthritis and rheumatism, chronic recalcitrant neuralgia, arthralgia, and immune-related diseases. BVT is also used to desensitize patients to bee stings and thus inhibit allergic reactions"
A typical reaction a bee sting (Photo credit: Jim Kalisch; UNL Entomology)