Wednesday, October 21, 2020

Arthro-Pod EP 81- Dr. Harold Harlan and the Modern Bed Bug Resurgence

 

Tune in today as Dr. Jody Green, of the Arthro-Pod gang, sits down to interview living legend, Dr. Harold Harlan. They discuss Dr. Harlan's career as an entomologist as well as the history of his infamous bed bug colony. Plus, they dive in to the history of the modern bed bug resurgence. All that and more on Arthro-Pod!


Drs. Green and Harlan at the Entomological Society of America 2019 meeting

Show Notes-

Possible reasons for resurgence include:

o   Increase in international travel

o   Changes in pest management

o   Insecticide resistance mechanisms

o   Lack of reaction to bed bugs

o   Adaptation of bed bugs to alternative hosts

o   Bed bugs and poultry farms

o   Ability of bed bugs to go months without a blood meal

o   High density housing and high turnover

 

Resources:

 

Book: Monograph of Cimicidae

Usinger 1966 (pdf)

https://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/Monograph-of-Cimicidae-(Hemiptera%2C-Heteroptera)-Hoogstraal-Usinger/a110401bcd457acd5c19e3971b5f4473de498c70

 

Book: Advances in the Biology and Management of Modern Bed Bugs

Editors: Doggett, Miller and Lee 2018

https://www.wiley.com/en-us/Advances+in+the+Biology+and+Management+of+Modern+Bed+Bugs-p-9781119171522

 

Article: PCT Magazine from November 2011

Love at First Bite

https://www.pctonline.com/article/pct1111-bed-bugs-scientist/ 

 

Bed bugs evolved before their bat hosts and did not co-speciate with ancient humans

Roth et al. 2019

https://www.cell.com/action/showPdf?pii=S0960-9822%2819%2930477-4

Questions? Comments? 
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This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/



Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

Wednesday, August 19, 2020

Arthro-Pod EP 80: Chagas disease and kissing bugs

Tune in today to hear the Arthro-Pod gang discuss Chagas disease and kissing bugs. All the hosts have had questions asked of them about this disease and the insect that can help vector the causal parasite. There are lots of stories out there about the dangers but what is the truth about Chagas in much of the US? We'll cover the parasite, the disease, and kissing bugs like the eastern bloodsucking conenose in this episode!

Triatoma infestans one of the important vectors of Chagas ()
 

Show notes

Disease: Chagas disease 

Parasite: Trypanosoma cruzi 

Reservoirs: Mammals 

Vectors: Triatomine bugs or kissing bugs  

Reduviidae are a family otherwise known as assassin bugs that are Hemipterans. They have three segmented beak used to stab prey, which are mostly insects. According to Bug Guide, there are 195 species, 55 genera including wheel bug, jagged ambush bug, four spurred assassin bug (Zelus), masked hunter, and Sinea species (no common name)  

Commonly misidentified non-reduviids: Western conifer seed bug, squash bugs,  

 

Wheel bugs are often misidentified as kissing bugs (Photo by Jody Green)

When people spot squash bugs they sometimes fear they are kissing bugs (photo by Jody Green)


Kissing bugs 

Texas A&M - Kissing Bugs & Chagas Disease in the United States https://kissingbug.tamu.edu/ 

CDC – Chagas Disease https://www.cdc.gov/parasites/chagas/ 

 

PJ. Liesch from UW Madison Department of Entomology –  

 

Research papers: 

Bern et al. 2011 – Trypanosoma cruzi and Chagas’ disease in the United States 

Klotz et al. 2014 – Kissing bugs in the United States: Risks for vector-borne disease in humans 

Salazar et al. 2015 – Bed bugs (Cimex lectularius) as vectors of Trypanosoma cruzi 


Questions? Comments? 
Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_Podshow

Follow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon@JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36

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This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/



Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

Friday, July 31, 2020

Arthro-Pod EP 79: What Goes Up Must Come Down- Insect Populations


As Extension professionals, the Arthro-Pod gang often gets asked questions about where a certain insect has disappeared to. It's a tough question to answer because there are so many factors that can impact insect populations. Today we're going to try and unpack some of those factors and talk about why you might be noticing fewer cicadas or why there was suddenly an explosion of butterflies in your area. Tune in!

Photo of Japanese beetle cluster by Jim Kalisch; UNL Entomology 


Show notes you can read through


Questions? Comments? 
Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_Podshow

Follow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon@JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36

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We're also on Stitcher!

This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/



Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

Wednesday, July 22, 2020

Arthro-Pod EP 78: Insecticide Resistance with Caleb Hubbard



On today's episode of Arthro-Pod, the gang meets with Caleb Hubbard of the University of California Riverside. Caleb is a veterinary entomologist that works with house flies that can cause issues with dairy farms. These flies can be tough to control but also complicate things by becoming resistant to the insecticides we use against them. 

Tune in to learn about what insecticide resistance is, how it develops, and how researchers try to figure out ways to study it. Also, we learn a recipe for maggot food that sounds pretty yummy. 



Show notes

Some papers to review if you would like




Questions? Comments? 
Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_Podshow

Follow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon@JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36

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This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/



Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

Thursday, June 25, 2020

Arthro-Pod EP 77: All About Galls with Denise Montelongo



Hey everyone, Michael here. I'm excited to share an interview I recorded with Denise Montelongo about gall wasps and her work on them at Penn State. We talked about what a gall is, what kind of organisms make galls, cynipid gall wasps, and a whole lot more.


You can follow Denise's work through the Frost Museum on Twitter @FrostMuseum and the web; you can also sign up for the Museum's newsletter.


Questions? Comments? 
Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_Podshow

Follow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon@JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36

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This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/



Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

Tuesday, June 9, 2020

Arthro-Pod EP 76: What Bugs Bug the Entomologists?



Usually, the Arthro-Pod crew is all about tying to convince people that insects are cool and to be appreciated. However, they are only human and even they have some insects that they have convoluted pasts with. Some of them they may have come around on but others... well maybe it's best they stay separated! Tune in to hear each host's story!







Show Notes

EARWIGS

Video about wing folding for earwigs: https://youtu.be/Q4NiF3w101Q

Scientific paper about earwig wing folding: https://bio.biologists.org/content/5/5/638?rss=1

Deep look about what earwigs (maratime earwgs, which are cousins of European earwigs) use their forceps for: https://youtu.be/HuOnqWpIL9E

How to tell the temperature with a cricket
https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/bring-science-home-cricket-temperature/



Questions? Comments? 
Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_Podshow

Follow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon@JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36

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We're also on Stitcher!

This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/



Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

Friday, May 15, 2020

Arthro-Pod EP 75: The Rise and Fall of DDT Part 2


Welcome back to Arthro-Pod! Today is part two of our deep dive into the history of DDT, a long and convoluted story that has lots of effects on us today. This portion of the story is about the long fall that DDT had, beginning with the publication of "Silent Spring" by Rachel Carson and ending with the creation of the Environmental Protection Agency in 1970. We talk about the way people viewed Rachel Carson and her work, what the problem is with believing in a "silver bullet", and how DDT may have helped politicize environmentalism. 


Show notes
Learn more about Rachel Carson and her work at https://www.rachelcarson.org


This is also a good look at current perspectives on her and her work
https://slate.com/technology/2012/09/silent-spring-turns-50-biographer-william-souder-clears-up-myths-about-rachel-carson.html

If you enjoyed the show, the majority of the research for it came from David Kinkela's book "DDT and The American Century". It's highly recommended if you want to see more of the primary sources and the inspiration for a lot of our discussion.

https://uncpress.org/book/9781469609775/ddt-and-the-american-century/


Questions? Comments? 
Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_Podshow

Follow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon@JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36

Get the show through Apple Podcasts!

Subscribe to our feed on Feedburner!  


We're also on Stitcher!


This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/




Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0