Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Arthro-Pod Episode 3: Oriental Cockroaches and Frightening Insect Films part 1







Our episode today begins our descent into insect horror movies! For the month of October we will be discussing two movies in this sub-genre and dissecting what the insects may symbolize as well as the biology that may make them so scary! We start with The Swarm from 1978. 



Trailer for The Swarm:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YpO4gvW6D3Q

Ridiculous moments from the film:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7e0LdNr9XzI


Materials on Africanized bees

Utah State extension sheet
University of Georgia extension bulletin 
National Geographic video on Africanized bees

PEST PROFILE



Of course, we also continue down our pest management path with a new pest profile. This week we describe the oriental cockroach, aka the waterbug, and talk shop on IPM based methods of control. Tune in if you find yourself dealing with this particular pest!



Questions? Comments? 

Email: unl.jonathanlarson@gmail.com

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Thanks for listening!

This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

Intermission music: "Bump in the Night" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0


4 comments:

  1. If you missed it, you might consider getting a copy of an article that was in American Entomologist last year, "Secrets of the “Big Bugs” Special Effects in 1950s Science Fiction Movies". I don't know if there's a way to work it into the podcast, but it might be interesting to read nonetheless.

    http://esa.publisher.ingentaconnect.com/content/esa/ae/2013/00000059/00000004/art00006

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  2. It should be noted that other cockroaches also live in damp mulch. Native wood roaches (Parcoblatta sp.) live in such areas, can be attracted to lights at night, especially the males which can fly, and can be confused with pest roach species. Luckily for homeowners, wood roaches die within a few days of entering a house as they do not feed on a wide range of organic matter like pest roaches do.

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    Replies
    1. An excellent point! Not all roaches are our enemies.

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