Monday, November 28, 2022

Arthro-Pod EP 126: Deer Keds with our own Michael Skvarla

Today's episode is a special treat as we invite our very own, Michael Skvarla to swap his host hat for a guest's chair. For years, Jody has wanted to pick Mike's brain about deer keds, a topic both she and Jonathan know little about. Luckily, over the past few years, Mike has become something on an expert on the topic. Tune in to learn all about these ectoparasitic, wingless, and interesting flies and how they live, thrive, and survive (plus a little about when people run into them). 

It's us! Talking about deer keds! 



Also wanted to give a big shoutout to Jody for winning an award for excellence in Extension for her efforts in Nebraska and around the country. We're very proud of her and her commitment to science communication and we hope you will drop her a note of congratulations!

Show Notes
 
 CONTENT WARNING: DEAD ANIMALS.
 
All photographs by Michael Skvarla unless otherwise noted.

 European deer ked (Lipoptena cervi). Mammal-feeding deer keds emerge with wings but shed them after landing on a host. Photo by Erika Machtinger, Penn State University.
 
 
European deer ked on a white-tailed deer. This ked has shed it's wings. The abdomen has expanded after it took a blood meal.
 
European deer ked on a white-tailed deer.

European deer keds on the muzzle of an elk. This photo was not staged, the keds were just very abundant.




Michael and Penn State Vector Ecology Lab personnel searching for deer keds on a white-tailed deer at deer processors across Pennsylvania. Photos by Erika Matchinger and Michael Skvarla, Penn State University.
 
 
We searched through literal piles of deer.
 
 
 The easiest way to find deer keds on host is to part the hair in sequence like you're sifting through papers in a file folder. We found that the best way to do that quickly was using a louse comb. Fine forceps are then used to grab the ked before it "swims" back into the hair.

Pennsylvania elk at the PA Game Commission elk check station. Deer keds will land on any cervid, including deer and elk. Elk season in Pennsylvania is earlier than deer rifle season, so gave us an opportunity to collect deer keds a few weeks earlier than usual.

Neotropical deer keds on a white-tailed deer harvested in Tennessee. Similar to European deer keds in Pennsylvania, some deer in Tennessee were loaded with keds while others were comparatively clean.

Example of a PA Parasite Hunters collection kit that was sent to hunters to collect ticks and deer keds from deer they harvested.

To test if deer keds responded to common insect repellents such as DEET, we marked off sections on a sock, applied the repellent, put the sock over an arm, and allowed keds to freely climb from an arena up the sock. At the end of 5 minutes we scored if they crossed the repellent or not.

 

Questions? Comments? 

Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_Podshow

Follow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon@JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36


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This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/



Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0



Thursday, November 17, 2022

Arthro-Pod EP 125: The Arthro-Pod Guide to Choosing a Grad School

Howdy bug lovers! Today's show is inspired by a listener request to talk about the different graduate entomology programs you can find here in the United States. We didn't want to rank programs necessarily, so we decided to talk about what we think is most important to think about when you are choosing a school to call home for a master's or doctoral degree. 

Tune in to hear about how each of us ended up in our graduate programs, what to look for in a potential mentor, some of the pitfalls of grad school, and maybe some advice on how to stay sane while you study your favorite insects!


Show Notes

There are rankings online that are aimed to help you see which entomology departments are the “best” though but question if the data used to create these ranking is applicable to you and your success as a graduate student. Does a program with many faculty or high level of federal funding necessarily have a good graduate experience?

·         https://www.collegefactual.com/majors/biological-biomedical-sciences/zoology/entomology/rankings/top-ranked/

·         https://www.collegeraptor.com/Majors/Details/26.0702/Level/Masters-degree/State/All/Entomology/

·         https://www.universities.com/programs/entomology-degrees


You can check out this link from the Entomological Society of America for a fairly exhaustive list of possible grad school programs in entomology 

Questions? Comments? 

Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_Podshow

Follow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon@JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36


Get the show through Apple PodcastStitcherSpotify, or your favorite podcatching app!
If you can spare a moment, we appreciate when you subscribe to the show on those apps or when you take time to leave a review!


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This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/



Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0




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Monday, October 31, 2022

Arthro-Pod EP 124: Investigating Forensic Entomology with Krystal Hans

 

Welcome back to Arthro-Pod! Today's show features Dr. Krystal Hans of Purdue University. Dr. Hans is a forensic entomologist and she guides the gang through wriggly and wonderful world of using bugs to solve crime. Tune in to learn about how to get into forensics, how evidence is collected, and in what order the insects would colonize your body!

Larval Chrysomya rufifaces, photo by Andrew Meeds

Show Notes

You can find Dr. Hans online in these spaces

Lab website: https://ag.purdue.edu/department/entm/hans-lab/index.html

Consulting Website: https://hansforensics.com

Tik Tok: Forensic Entomology

Instagram: hans_forensic_entomology

Twitter: @KrystalHans

Learn more about forensic entomology at these sites

North American Forensic Entomology Association 

Texas A&M forensic entomology write up

Entomology Today article

Adult Chrysomya rufifaces, Photo by Andrew Meeds

Questions? Comments? 

Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_Podshow

Follow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon@JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36


Get the show through Apple PodcastStitcherSpotify, or your favorite podcatching app!
If you can spare a moment, we appreciate when you subscribe to the show on those apps or when you take time to leave a review!


Subscribe to our feed on Feedburner!  




This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/



Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

Friday, October 21, 2022

Arthro-Pod EP 123: Brown Recluse Spiders with Rick Vetter

 

Today on Arthro-Pod, the gang meets up with Dr. Rick Vetter of UC Riverside to bring you buckets of info on the brown recluse spider. This species of arachnid seems to inspire the most fear of all our eight legged friends. Tune in to hear all about their biology, why they seem to do well living in our homes, and some facts about their venom and bite. Maybe after hearing what we have to say, you'll see these spiders in a slightly different light!

The "face" of a brown recluse spider, Jody Green Nebraska Extension


If you have an interest in learning more about brown recluse spiders, we highly encourage you to buy and read Rick's book which can be found at these links:

Cornell Press

Kindle 

Bookshop.org

The famous "fiddle" on the top of a brown recluse spider. Lisa Ames, University of Georgia, Bugwood.org 

Show notes

Rick Vetter's website

The known range of brown recluse spider establishment. 

Brown recluse spiders on a glue board trap, Jody Green Nebraska Extension

Questions? Comments? 

Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_Podshow

Follow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon@JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36


Get the show through Apple PodcastStitcherSpotify, or your favorite podcatching app!
If you can spare a moment, we appreciate when you subscribe to the show on those apps or when you take time to leave a review!


Subscribe to our feed on Feedburner!  




This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/



Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0



Thursday, September 29, 2022

Arthro-Pod EP 122: The Spongy Moth after Trouvelot

Howdy bug lovers! Today the Arthro-Pod gang is going back in history to discuss the spongy moth after its introduction by Trouvelot. We will start our journey at the nascent site of the University of Massachusetts at Amherst in 1891 when specimens of the spongy moth were delivered to some entomologists working there. After that, it is off to the races with political intrigue, bureaucratic  frustrations, a variety of economic entomology pioneers, and unfortunately no eradication of this important invasive species. Tune in to find out more about what happened and what failed as well as for discussion on if the early eradication campaigns were worth it. 


Show notes

https://storymaps.arcgis.com/stories/b60f63199fa14805a8b9f7c82447a25b#ref-n-esdBTD

https://portal.ct.gov/DEEP/Forestry/Forest-Protection/The-Spongy-Moth-A-Brief-History

https://www.fs.usda.gov/treesearch/pubs/19541

Much of the research for today's episode comes from a book by Robert Spear, "The Great Gypsy Moth War"



Questions? Comments? 

Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_Podshow

Follow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon@JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36


Get the show through Apple PodcastStitcherSpotify, or your favorite podcatching app!
If you can spare a moment, we appreciate when you subscribe to the show on those apps or when you take time to leave a review!


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This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/



Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0


Monday, September 19, 2022

Arthro-Pod EP 121: The Bugs of Starship Troopers

Today the Arthro-Pod gang are teaming up to do their part to dissect the 1997 film, Starship Troopers. Directed by Paul Verhoeven and starring a motley mix of 1990's handsome people, the sci-fi film fared poorly in its original theatrical run. After re-evaluation current critical consensus is that the film is a great parody of fascism and the arc of authoritarian governments. 

We'll talk about all that but we really want to focus on the bugs... Are they realistic, for giant space bugs that is? What insects inspired them? What exactly are they doing out there in space? 
Do you want to know more...?


Show Notes





Check out the "Starship Troopers" wiki if you want to learn about the various species of "bugs". 




Questions? Comments? 

Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_Podshow

Follow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon@JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36


Get the show through Apple PodcastStitcherSpotify, or your favorite podcatching app!
If you can spare a moment, we appreciate when you subscribe to the show on those apps or when you take time to leave a review!


Subscribe to our feed on Feedburner!  




This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/



Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0




Wednesday, August 31, 2022

Arthro-Pod EP 120: Asian Longhorned Tick and Theileria

 

Hello bug lovers and welcome back to Arthro-Pod! In today's episode Jody and Jonathan sit down and talk ticks! Specifically they cover the Asian longhorned tick, an invasive species that has been spreading in the United States for the last few years. This astonishing tick has been found on numerous animals and is well known for their asexual reproduction. In addition, Jonathan talks about the recent find of theileria in the state of Kentucky. Tune in for lots of veterinary entomology talk and discussions on invasive species!





Show notes

Asian longhorned tick info-

The Asian longhorned tick, an invasive tick species has been in the news a lot since it has been discovered in the US several years ago. They were first reported in New Jersey in 2017, though research at Rutgers has shown that the species may have been in the state since as early as 2013.

https://www.rutgers.edu/news/where-did-asian-longhorned-ticks-us-come

Since the initial find, the tick has been found in 17 states (MO, AR, KY, TN, OH, WV, VA, GA, SC, NC, MD, DE, PA, NY, CT, NJ, RI).

https://www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis/maps/Animal-Health/asian-longhorned-tick

The situation in Kentucky

https://kentuckypestnews.wordpress.com/2022/08/16/new-tick-transmitted-cattle-disease-now-confirmed-in-kentucky/

Theileria-

The cases of theileria in Tennessee were first reported at the start of June 2022 and involved cattle in the central portion of the state.

https://vetmed.tennessee.edu/theileria-orientalis-ikeda-in-tennessee/

Prior to this, there were cases of Ikeda documented from Virginia, West Virginia, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and Kansas. Oher genotypes of Theileria reported in Missouri, North Carolina, and Michigan.

https://vitals.vetmed.vt.edu/content/dam/vitals_vetmed_vt_edu/documents/theilieria-summary.pdf

http://ksvdl.org/resources/news/diagnostic_insights/april2022/theileria.html

Questions? Comments? 

Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_Podshow

Follow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon@JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36


Get the show through Apple PodcastStitcherSpotify, or your favorite podcatching app!
If you can spare a moment, we appreciate when you subscribe to the show on those apps or when you take time to leave a review!


Subscribe to our feed on Feedburner!  




This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/



Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0