Tuesday, June 28, 2022

Arthro-Pod EP 116: The Splendor of Fireflies

Join the Arthro-Pod gang as they get together to talk about the many insects that are taking over summer 2022 in their respective states and the stress that comes with them. But instead of lamenting, they decided to talk about an insect they love and hope you do to, the firefly. We cover the different names these glowing insects can have, their relatives, how they glow and why! Join us won't you?

An adult firefly waiting for dusk to settle in so it can begin to flash their bioluminescent light


Show Notes:

What do you call the insects that have a glowing rear end? There is data and some maps about the differences in regional names for the US associated with fireflies. 





Here is a chart that helps to separate out the various patterns that you might see in the night in the Eastern US

Femme fatale fireflies and the acquisition of biochemical defenses

The story of collecting fireflies for a penny bounty

How to build firefly habitat in a backyard

If you would like to read a great book all about these nocturnal wonders, we highly recommend this one:
https://ugapress.org/book/9780820348728/fireflies-glow-worms-and-lightning-bugs/

Questions? Comments? 

Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_Podshow

Follow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon@JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36


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This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/



Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0





Tuesday, June 21, 2022

Arthro-Pod EP 115: Bed bugs in poultry houses with Maria Gonzales-Morales

At the National Conference on Urban Entomology in May, Jody was inspired by Maria Gonzalez-Morales, a grad student from North Carolina State University, and asked for a chance to interview her! She graciously jumped to the mic and the two of them talked about how urban pests have an impact on agriculture. Maria has spent her time during her PHD studying insecticide resistance and in this interview discusses her work specifically with bed bugs in poultry farms. Maria also talks about her dream for the future, which involves creating an inclusive place for Hispanics to learn and be impowered by the information generated from the entomological research around the world. Take a listen. You won’t be disappointed. 

Maria and her national award! Congratulations to her!!

Tuesday, May 31, 2022

Arthro-Pod EP 114: For the Love of Aphids with Kait Chapman

While traveling to a conference in Salt Lake City, UT from Nebraska, Jody realizes that she doesn't know much about her colleague, Kait Chapman. To her surprise and glee, they get into talking about Kait's MS/PhD research which is all about the fabulous insect-plant interactions involved in the relationship between aphids and their host plants. Take a listen to a discussion about animal-loving beginnings, telescoping generations, aphids on tiny bungee cords, host plant responses, and the love-hate relationship between a grad student and her subject insect.





In this closeup of a mama aphid, you can see her offspring inside of her. Those small dots are the eyes of the aphid she will birth. 


A side by side look at aphid tolerant (L) and aphid susceptible (R) varieties of soybeans
Aphids can create symptomatic damage like curled leaves, wilting, and copious amounts of honeydew.


This cabbage aphid is coated in a white wax material. You can also see it is exuding an alarm pheromone (the yellow colored droplet)

Aphids are also quite small, though they add up when in big groups!



This aphid is wired and ready for EPG

Questions? Comments? 

Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_Podshow

Follow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon@JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36


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This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/



Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0



Wednesday, May 18, 2022

Arthro-Pod EP 113: Why do people want kill praying mantises?


The Arthro-Pod gang have had a weird influx of questions from people about how they can best kill Chinese mantises. There has been a lot of concern regarding how they might be invasive and their effects on native species. Join us as we dive in to a complicated topic of parsing through native, non-native, and invasive species and highlight the biology of mantises plus the ways they normally capture our attention. With Chinese mantis, why the hate? What part might anti-Asian sentiment play in the attempts to control them? All that and more in episode 113!

An adult Chinese mantis, wondering what the heck we're talking about
Photo by Whitney Cranshaw, Colorado State

Show notes:

Here are some articles highlighting the controversy

https://www.brandywine.org/conservancy/blog/invasive-mantis-species 

https://www.insidescience.org/news/lessons-about-love-and-invasion-americas-foreign-mantises

Questions? Comments? 

Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_Podshow

Follow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon@JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36


Get the show through Apple PodcastStitcherSpotify, or your favorite podcatching app!
If you can spare a moment, we appreciate when you subscribe to the show on those apps or when you take time to leave a review!


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This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/



Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0


 

Thursday, April 28, 2022

Arthro-Pod EP 112: Meet Dr. Val Korneyev, Ukrainian Entomologist

In this episode, Michael and Jonathan speak with Dr. Val Korneyev, professor of entomology and head of the Entomology Department at the Schmalhausen Institute of Zoology in Kyiv, Ukraine. Topics discussed include his work with tephritoid fruit flies, the 6 million specimen collection at the institute, and evacuating important type specimens from Kyiv to Berlin, Germany during the 2022 Russian invasion of Ukraine. Other anecdotes include coming of age as a scientist in the USSR during the 1980's and dealing with the KGB, the view of Ukrainian science to some in Western Europe and the Americas, as well as the future oUkrainian entomology after the war.

 Viktor Baranov (left, guest in Episode 108) and Valery Korneyev (right). Photos courtesy of Viktor Baranov via Twitter.

 


Bags containing boxes of type specimens being evacuated from Kyiv to Berlin during the Russian invasion of Ukraine. Photos courtesy of Viktor Baranov via Twitter.


If you want to learn more about Val's scholarly work, here are his Google Scholar profile and Research Gate profile, as well as presentations he's given on Old World Pyrgotidae and “Parasitic Fruit Flies”: Pyrgotidae, Ctenostylidae, Tachiniscidae.



Questions? Comments? 

Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_Podshow

Follow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon@JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36


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If you can spare a moment, we appreciate when you subscribe to the show on those apps or when you take time to leave a review!


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This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/



Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0


 

Friday, April 15, 2022

Arthro-Pod EP 111: The League of Entomology Consultants

 

Welcome back to Arthro-Pod bug lovers! Today's episode is a jam-packed guest bonanza, with three visitors stopping by to talk about their careers. We are joined by Jennifer Gordon of Bug Lessons, Chelle Hartzer of 360 Pest and Food Consulting, and Janet Kintz-Early of JAK Consulting Services. We dive into what being an entomological consultant means, the services they offer, and how one might get into the career field. It is a lot of fun to hear from folks who are passionate about their work and have some interesting entomological tales to tell. Tune in to hear all about it! 

The making of a podcast!



Show Notes


Chelle Hartzer and 360 Pest & Food

Website: https://www.chellehartzer.com/

Latest "Wine-ing about pest control": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ahYbnNMsEIQ

Jennifer Gordon and Bug Lessons

Website:  www.buglessons.com

Janet Kintz-Early and JAK Pesticide Consultants

Website: https://www.jakconsultingservices.com/ 


Questions? Comments? 

Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_Podshow

Follow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon@JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36


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If you can spare a moment, we appreciate when you subscribe to the show on those apps or when you take time to leave a review!


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This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/



Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

Monday, April 4, 2022

Arthro-Pod EP 110: The Spongy Moth and Trouvelot's Bad Idea

 

Last episode, we dove into the reasons why the ESA chose to select a new common name for Lymantria dispar and why we'll be using spongy moth going forward. Today's episode looks further into this species by covering the introduction of spongy moth to North America. This historic event was the result of an idea by entomologist Etienne Leopold Trouvelot. In an attempt to establish an American silk industry, Trouvelot imported this invasive species and sadly lost control of them, ultimately imposing a mighty pest on North America. Join us to hear about what he was thinking, what exactly happened in Medford, MA, and what fate befell Trouvelot and the situation he created. 


Here we can see Trouvelot on the left, in the only known photo of him. Next to him, the spongy moth caterpillar which he unfortunately helped bring to North America. 

Show Notes:

Much of the research for today's episode comes from a book by Robert Spear, "The Great Gypsy Moth War"


Trouvelot may have had a bad idea for his entomology research, but he did garner some renown in the world of astronomy in the second half of his academic life. As we detail in the episode, he was able to command a premium price for his services and artwork and his celestial art still captures attention today. Here's just a few examples: 

Trouvelot's lunar craters

Trouvelot's Jupiter

The Jupiter drawing as it appears in an episode of Star Trek

Trouvelot's Saturn


Questions? Comments? 

Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_Podshow

Follow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon@JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36


Get the show through Apple PodcastStitcherSpotify, or your favorite podcatching app!
If you can spare a moment, we appreciate when you subscribe to the show on those apps or when you take time to leave a review!


Subscribe to our feed on Feedburner!  




This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/



Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0