Wednesday, June 2, 2021

Arthro-Pod EP 89: The Haitian Revolution (Part 3 of the Napoleon vs Insects Series)

 

In this episode we discuss the stress factors in the French sugar colony of Saint-Domingue that led to the Haitian revolution, including slavery and the racial apartheid system; how the Haitian revolution was intertwined with and influenced by the French Revolution; the decimation of British troops by yellow fever and the failed British invasion of Saint-Domingue; and the rise of Toussaint Louverture, whose actions would provoke Napoleon into invading Saint-Domingue.

The island of Hispaniola is dominated by tall, east-west running mountains.

Map of the provinces of French Saint-Dominuge, showing the relative locations of the North, West, and South.

"Napoleon Bonaparte in the coup d'état of 18 Brumaire in Saint-Cloud" by François Bouchot

"Mortals are equal, it is not birth, but virtue alone that makes the difference". There was an abolotionist movement among the French aristocracy prior to the French and Haitian Revolutions, as illustrated by this illustration.

"Burning of the Plaine du Cap - Massacre of whites by the blacks". Most of the contemporary illustrations of the Haitian Revolution were produced by  Europeans and show Black slaves murdering White planters. While such atrocaties happened, such skewed presentations that did not include the brutality the former slaves faced, helped skew public opinion outside of Saint Domingue against the slaves. 

Illustration of jungle fighting between French troops and Black former slaves. "Saint Domingue: Capture of Ravine-à-Couleuvres"

"Portrait of Léger-Félicité Sonthonax (1763-1813)" by an unknown painter. 

"Toussaint Louverture" by Alexandre-François-Louis, comte de Girardin, painted posthumously.


Questions? Comments? 
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This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/



Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0


Wednesday, May 12, 2021

Arthro-Pod EP 88: Periodical cicada BROOD X Quiz Bowl!

 The Arthro-Pod crew is super excited about the emergence of the periodical cicadas known as Brood X this year! To celebrate Jody created a quiz competition for Mike and Jonathan to face off through! The questions can be found on Kahoot if you would like to give it a shot! Just look for the Periodical Cicada Quiz with 26 questions. Tune in to learn about the cicadas coming out this year and get excited to go find them!

The cicadas are here! Photo by Daniel Herms, The Ohio State University, Bugwood.org 

Show notes

Periodical Cicadas the Brood X Edition by Gene Kritsky
Check out this Scientific American article that talks about the important contributions of 
Margaretta Hare Morris to our understanding of cicadas

The University of Connecticut houses a lot of great info on the distribution of cicadas

o   https://cicadas.uconn.edu/broods/ 

Cicada Mania is a resource everyone should check out if they are interested in these awesome creatures. In particular look at their pages on cicada biology/natural history and discussions on the broods

o   https://www.cicadamania.com/cicadas/how-many-kinds-of-cicadas-are-there/

Finally, please consider downloading and using the Cicada Safari app if you get to go out and look for these screaming teenage bugs!

Questions? Comments? 
Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_Podshow

Follow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon@JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36

Get the show through Apple Podcasts!

Subscribe to our feed on Feedburner!  


We're also on Stitcher!

This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/



Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0


Thursday, April 29, 2021

Arthro-Pod EP 87: Napoleon versus Insects Part 2

 Hello everyone and welcome back to Arthro-Pod! On today's show, we enter Egypt in part two of our four part series on the history of insects messing with Napoleon. This one has it all, imperialism, plague, war, and intriguing ideas on the origins of issues with the Black Death. Tune in to learn more!

Map of Ottoman Egypt and Syria, showing cities where major events happened during the French Invasion. From The Historical Atlas by William R. Shepherd (1926).  Via wikimedia, in the public domain.


 The Battle of the Pyramids (1808) by Louis-François Lejeune, who was a French general, painter, and lithographer. While Lejeune was not present at the battle and the painting is stylized, his military training informs many aspects of the piece, including the accurate depiction of the French square and the far distance to the pyramids, which were often made to appear much closer by other painters. Via wikimedia, in the public domain.

Battle of the Nile, Augt 1st 1798, by Thomas Whitcombe,  published as plate 26 in James Jenkin's Naval Achievements of Great Britain from the Year 1793 to 1817. The British fleet under Admiral Horatio Nelson bears down upon the anchored French fleet in Abukir Bay.  Via wikimedia, in the public domain.

The Destruction of "L'Orient" at the Battle of the Nile, 1 August 1798, by George Arnald (1825-27).  Via wikimedia, in the public domain.

Napoleon in Cairo, by Jean-Léon Gérôme (1863).  Via wikimedia, in the public domain.

Napoleon visiting the plague victims of Jaffa by Antoine-Jean Gros (1804).   Via wikimedia, in the public domain.

La Bataille du mont Tabor, en Syrie, le 27 germinal an VI by Louis François Lejeune (1808).  Via wikimedia, in the public domain.

Photograph of buboes on the leg of a person who has contracted bubonic plague. Via the CDC Public Health Library, in the public domain.

Oriental rat flea (Xenopsylla cheopsis), one of the main vectors of plague bacteria. Micrograph by James Gathany, CDC. Image in the public domain.

Human  louse (Pediculus humanus), which was an important vector of plague bacteria during the Black Death, which swept across Europe.

A black rat (Rattus rattus), which was the main host of plague bacteria on ships during the three Plague Pandemics, showing off the arboreal nature of the species.

Questions? Comments? 
Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_Podshow

Follow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon@JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36

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This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/



Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0


Wednesday, April 14, 2021

Arthro-Pod EP 86: Conserving the American Burying Beetle with Dr. Carmen Greenwood

 Hello bug lovers! Today we're happy to welcome Dr. Carmen Greenwood of SUNY Cobleskill to the show. Dr. Greenwood recently received funding to help reintroduce the American burying beetle to New York state and this is a very exciting development in the conservation of this amazing insect. Tune in to learn about the history of the American burying beetle, its unique biology, and what steps are involved in a conservation project like this!





Show Notes
American burying beetle info: https://www.dec.ny.gov/animals/7124.html

Questions? Comments? 
Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_Podshow

Follow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon@JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36

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Subscribe to our feed on Feedburner!  


We're also on Stitcher!

This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/



Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0


Wednesday, March 31, 2021

Arthro-Pod EP 85: Napoleon versus Insects Part 1

 

Hello bug lovers! Today is the first part in a multi-part series that will focus on the history of Napoleon Bonaparte and his very special interactions with insects and the pathogens they may harbor. 

This is a labor of love from host Michael Skvarla and this first episode is a prelude of sorts. Tune in to learn about the context in which Napoleon ascends to power, thus being informed for the future episodes that will have more entomology flavor to them. 

Portrait of Napoleon Bonaparte in 1792,  aged 23, as lieutenant-colonel of a battalion of Corsican Republican volunteers, by Henri Félix Emmanuel Philippoteaux.

Show notes and images

James Gillray's policital cartoons helped cement the image of Napoleon as a short, angry man in the public imagination. Shown here is "Maniac-raving's-or-Little Boney in a strong fit", which is characteristic of Gillray's depictions of Napoleon.

Portrait of King Louis XVI by Antoine-François Callet.

The regional Parlements in 1789. Note the extreme differences in size between the various Parlements.

Opening of the Estates General on May 5, 1789 in the Grands Salles des Menus-Plaisirs in Versailles

The storming of the Bastille, an important turning point during the French Revolution. By Jean-Pierre Houël.

King Louis XVI and his family, dressed as bourgeois, arrested during the Flight to Varrens. By Thomas Falcon Marshall.

Bonaparte at the Siege of Toulon, 1793, by Édouard Detaille.

Napoleon quelling of the Royalist revolt of 13 Vendémiaire using well-placed cannon fire and a "whiff of grapeshot". By Charles Monnet.

Napoleon at the Battle of Rivoli, one of the most important battles during the Italian campaign. Painting by Henri Félix Emmanuel Philippoteaux, 1845.

Questions? Comments? 
Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_Podshow

Follow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon@JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36

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This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/



Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0


Tuesday, March 9, 2021

Arthro-Pod EP 84: Pollinator Health with Judy Wu-Smart

 

Hello bug lovers! Join us today as we meet up with Dr. Judy Wu-Smart of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln to talk about her work with pollinator health. Dr. Wu-Smart runs the Bee Lab at UNL and is focused on mitigating stresses on honey bee hives and developing practical advice for beekeepers to use. She's also been in the news lately and we'll talk all about that experience. Tune in!



Show Notes:


Great Plains Anywhere Lecture




Wednesday, February 24, 2021

Arthro-Pod EP 83: My Pheromones Bring all the Bugs to the Yard

 


Hello bug lovers! On today's episode of Arthro-Pod the crew reunites after taking a small sabbatical and they are excited to bring you more entomology podcast fun. 

This episode focuses on pheromones in insects. Pheromones play an important role in the success of many different species of insect. We cover the basics of why insects use them, what the various kinds are, and how we have adapted these chemical cues to our own pest control ends. 




Show Notes


Questions? Comments? 
Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_Podshow

Follow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon@JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36

Get the show through Apple Podcasts!

Subscribe to our feed on Feedburner!  


We're also on Stitcher!

This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/



Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0

Wednesday, February 10, 2021

Arthro-Pod EP 82: Forest Entomology with Dr. Jess Hartshorn

 

Today we talk with Dr. Jess Hartshorn of Clemson University. We dive into her research on forest health, including how invasive callery pear may be affecting arthropod communities, as well as what it's like to be a woman in a male-dominated field and her efforts to promote equality through Feminist Forester. Tune in to hear about this and more on this episode of Arthro-Pod!

Show Notes

Jess is promoting the North American Forest Insect Work Conference which is being held virtually May 25-28, 2021. Here is the site: https://ccaps.umn.edu/2021-north-american-forest-insect-work-conference

You can find her lab at https://cuforesthealth.weebly.com/

Questions? Comments? 
Follow the show on Twitter @Arthro_Podshow

Follow the hosts on Twitter @bugmanjon@JodyBugsmeUNL, and @MSkvarla36

Get the show through Apple Podcasts!

Subscribe to our feed on Feedburner!  


We're also on Stitcher!

This episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/



Beginning/ending theme: "There It Is" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0